• Sleep is just as important as diet and exercise. Good sleep improves cognition, concentration, productivity, memory performance and problem solving skills. Short sleep can negatively impact some aspects of brain function to a similar degree as alcohol intoxication. You simply cannot achieve optimal health without taking care of your sleep.
  • About 1 in 5 adults fail to get enough sleep. Unfortunately, the Western way of life is interfering with national sleep patterns; people are sleeping less than they did in the past, with decreased sleep quality.
  • Humans are the only mammals that willingly delay sleep. This self-inflicted deprivation reduces our ability to interact socially. Studies confirm that people who had not slept had a reduced ability to recognize expressions of anger and happiness, thus inhibiting us to process emotional information.
  • One of the primary causes of excessive sleepiness among Americans is self-imposed sleep deprivation. Only we have the power to correct this with both a healthy psychological plan and the proper sleeping environment, of which the most important factor is the proper mattress.
  • People who don’t get enough sleep are more likely to have bigger appetites due to the fact that their Leptin levels fall, promoting appetite increase. Leptin is a peptide hormone that is produced by fat cells and plays a role in body weight regulation by acting on the hypothalamus to suppress appetite and burn fat stored in adipose tissue. Short sleep duration is one of the strongest risk factors for obesity. Also, good sleepers tend to eat fewer calories – no comfort food required.
  • Poor sleep affects our physical health and is believed to drive chronic diseases, including heart disease, stroke, glucose metabolism, type 2 diabetes, immune function, inflammation and cell damage, which can lead to auto-immune disease, inflammatory bowel disease and crohn’s disease.
  • Poor sleep is linked to depression. Almost 90% of depression patients complain about sleep quality. Sleeping disorders, such as insomnia or obstructive sleep apnea are linked to depression and is even associated with increased risk of death by suicide.
  • According to the National Sleep Foundation, 36% of Americans drive drowsy or have fallen asleep when drowsy. An astounding 69% report driving while drowsy at least once a month. Drowsy driving slows reaction times, reduces vigilance and impairs information processing. Sleep deprivation is a major cause of motor vehicle accidents.
  • The National Sleep Foundation recommends 7-to-9 hours of quality sleep per night.